PCCL Talking Circle

A talking circle is an informal gathering for people to share their thoughts, ideas, feelings and experiences. It is a traditional way of communicating in a respectful and positive environment. Each person in the talking circle is equal, even the people who lead the talking circle. These individuals are only there to provide guidelines and create a safe place for people to share their point of view. Participants learn to listen and respect the views of others. It is important to remember that what another person shares, does not belong to anyone else. It is strictly prohibited for anyone to share things about another participant. Often, talking circles begin with a traditional smudging ceremony, blessing, prayer, or song. An object is used as a talking piece. When a participant is holding the object, they have the right to speak without interruption. When they have completed sharing their thoughts, they pass the object to the next participant. When a participant is sharing, it is the responsibility of the other participants to listen with nonjudgment. Silence and passing is acceptable. Participants can express themselves in a way that they feel comfortable; sharing a story, an experience, by using example or metaphors, and so on.


Meet Ryan Hoard

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Ryan is a Registered Provisional Psychologist in Alberta. He has a Master of Arts in Counselling Psychology and 10 years of experience working in settings that include residential care and treatment, specialized behavioral treatment programs, community resilience and outreach, Indigenous based healing, community corrections as well as school and clinical psychology. Ryan primarily utilizes a Narrative approach to therapy that is rooted in an Indigenous worldview and he highlights supportive and collaborative relationships in a safe counselling environment that promotes resilience, self-determination and a sense of well-being.

 

In his work, Ryan often utilizes talking circles as an informal gathering for people to share their thoughts, ideas, feelings and experiences. It is a traditional way of communicating in a respectful and positive environment. When a member is sharing, it is the responsibility of the other participants to listen with nonjudgment. Participants can express themselves in a way that they feel comfortable; sharing a story, an experience, by using example or metaphors, and so on. 

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